Physiotherapy vs. Neuromuscular Massage

Physiotherapy is a health profession concerned with helping to restore physical well-being to people who are suffering from an injury, pain or disability. Using knowledge from our extensive scientific and clinical background (Masters or Doctorate of Physical Therapy), and they are Chartered Physiotherapists or managed by a professional association. They can assess, diagnose and treat conditions and illnesses that affect people of all ages and social groups.

Chartered Physiotherapists, or Physical Therapists, use manual therapy including manipulation, mobilization and myofascial release as well as complementary modalities including electrotherapy and Medical Acupuncture & Dry Needling. In recent years pain management education and counselling techniques have also become integral in most treatment programs. The Chartered Physiotherapist also utilizes prescriptive exercise as a rehabilitative tool to help patients achieve their full potential. While traditionally, Physiotherapy and/or Physical Therapy was regarded as rehabilitative and mainly hospital-based, the profession has expanded greatly into other health care areas. 

Neuromuscular therapy (NMT) is a specialized form of manual therapy that integrates specific massage techniques, flexibility stretching and home care practices to eliminate the causes of neuromuscular pain. NMT theory explains how injury, trauma and other factors can destabilize nerve transmission, making the body vulnerable to pain and dysfunction.

Through neuromuscular therapy training, students learn to manipulate muscles, tendons and connective tissue to restore balance to the central nervous system.

Neuromuscular therapy examines five elements that cause pain: ischemia (lack of blood flow), trigger points (more about trigger point therapy), nerve compression, postural distortion and biomechanical (movement) dysfunction. During an initial session, neuromuscular therapists interview patients about their health history, current physical condition, lifestyle, and stress levels and devise a treatment plan that addresses their pain syndromes.

Using fingers, knuckles or elbows, neuromuscular therapists apply concentrated pressure on areas of pain until they reach a trigger point, usually a spot that’s extra tender or numb. At this point, they’ll begin a stronger, more localized massage to relax the muscle. Relaxing muscles in this way releases lactic acid, increasing blood and oxygen flow, which, in turn, enhances the function of joints, muscles and movement.

Although both are forms of manual therapy, and they deal with the soft tissue of the body - Neuromuscular therapists can be more preventative - since they may see clients with varying degrees of discomfort. The appointments can also be used in conjunction with many other types of treatment including chiropractic visits, acupuncture, physical therapy and orthopedic rehabilitation (post surgery).

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